Mexico, a new adventure

As we leave the Mexican customs and Immigration facilities at Ciudad Hidalgo, we realise we can look look forward to a couple of weeks of border crossing free travel. However we still have to get our Temporary Vehicle Import paperwork at Huixtla, some 80km from the border. The strange location of the Customs facilities becomes clearer when you know that the Mexican / Guatemalan border has a dozen or so official crossings and some 370 unofficial ones!

The Mexican governments strategy is borders with depth. You can travel up to 25km into Mexico without additional paperwork, beyond that they have set up Customs checkpoints further inland on main routes to avoid unnecessary and expensive duplication of facilities nearer the border. A sensible strategy with such a porous border.

We will tackle the paperwork the following day before we travel towards Mexico City or as it is known here just Mexico or Mexico D.F. Again we enjoy the afternoon shower which leaves us well soaked and for once overnight the air-conditioning does not remove any of the water and we depart for Huixtla customs post as wet as when we arrived. Here the highway is diverted through the extensive Customs facility. Not a dirt bypass here! The morning sunshine does offer an opportunity to dry our gloves out!

Finally a chance to dry our wet gloves at the Mexican customs post

Finally a chance to dry our wet gloves at the Mexican customs post

We ride westwards with the southern tip of the Sierra Madre del Sur on our right. Vivid greenery runs right to the road’s edge, a mountain of work for the machete wielding workers at the roadside, although I did ponder if the high grass was left, it might provide a natural barrier in the event of accidents to slow cars and motorcycles down?

Overgrown grass or safety barrier in Mexico?

Overgrown grass or safety barrier in Mexico?

The roads are generally in reasonable condition along this stretch and we make good progress. We pass vast wind farms, I count at least 5 each over 100MW each. As we have mentioned before we are seeing quite sizeable wind farm developments as we have progressed through South and Central America. It would be interesting to see how these countries’ renewable energy sources stack up against the supposedly advanced countries like ours.

Wind farms in Mexico

Wind farms in Mexico

Storm brewing in Mexico

Storm brewing in Mexico

We keep a watchful eye on the clouds gathering to our right. They only seem to concern us, the truck drivers at our lunch stop seem uninterested in the weather, just a quiet siesta in the afternoon heat. We had seen hammocks for sale in many places that only locals would frequent, but had not seen them in action before.

Drivers taking a nap after lunch in Mexico

Drivers taking a nap after lunch in Mexico

Matías Romero Avendaño provides an overnight stop. Storm clouds gather but for the first time in a week we arrive before the heavens open up. Our first dry day and we are moving out of malaria territory. Tomorrow we will reach the coast and take a couple days’ R&R before we progress to Mexico City.

Our hotel in Matias Romero Avendano, Mexico

Our hotel in Matias Romero Avendano, Mexico


Our beachside destination is Boca del Rio, just outside Veracruz on the Mexican Caribbean coast. A four lane toll road provides a fast route to the coast, we note however the damaged road surface and while, for the first time in weeks, the speed limit is a seductive 110 km per hour, large potholes and crevasses in the concrete sections make for more dangerous riding and require keen observation to avoid most of the obstacles.

Mexican autopista

Mexican autopista

Mexican autopista

Mexican autopista

Boca del Rio is just what we needed, although the expected washing machine advertised on the website does not eventuate and the wet dog smell will persist till Mexico City.

We realise that evening that we have reached probably our lowest energy point on the trip. We both find it difficult to communicate clearly and misunderstand what we are saying to each other. We decide that night we will spend a second night here. We are not ready to travel on.

Beach, swimming and relaxing are the order of the day. Our evenings are spent at the nearby Irish pub, eating spicy Mexican/Irish food, listening to rock music and chatting with a couple of local motorcycle riders.

Boca del Rio, Mexico

Boca del Rio, Mexico

Anne enjoying her first scotch since arriving in South America

Anne enjoying her first scotch since arriving in South America

Anthony enjoying a beer at Boca del Rio

Anthony enjoying a beer at Boca del Rio


Our ride to Mexico City starts with an unexpected rain storm. The deluge leaves us travelling slowly trying to avoid the sheets of water that the buses and trucks generate, mostly unsuccessfully. Our persistence is rewarded, the sun returns and we can look forward to climbing from sea level to over 3,000 meters to cross the Sierra Madre Oriental. The climb near Maltrata is spectacular, two lanes in each direction that take completely different routes with little traffic almost makes you want to ride down and do it again except the temperature has dropped from 30 to 13 degrees celsius!

This is wet

This is wet

image
Anthony's turn

Anthony’s turn


The road in the distance is the opposite lane of the MEX150D

The road in the distance is the opposite lane of the MEX150D

The unusual and fantastic MEX150D road

The unusual and fantastic MEX150D road


Along the MEX150D - at 3,300m high

Along the MEX150D – at 3,300m high

Around this point we pass 35,000 km or 22,000 miles on this trip. What will our final mileage be, I estimate between 42,000 and 45,000 km. When we reach the USA I should put a poll up as to what you the reader estimate we will do to reach Montreal in early September.

Sign in a roadside cafe in Mexico - no alcohol for minors or people in uniform

Sign in a roadside cafe in Mexico – no alcohol for minors or people in uniform

We are staying with our friends, Anna and Alberto and their two daughters. They live on the western side of Mexico City, population estimated to be around 20 million and as we arrive from the east, a fun crossing awaits. In cities we have used taxis and especially since my GPS map stops short of the city so we get into the centre and hire a taxi to follow. Given the style of driving here to avoid losing the taxi, one needs to sit about half a meter off his bumper to avoid being squeezed out by other drivers. Wish I had the skill of a Formula 1 driver that can do that easily. It takes us 3 hours to cross Mexico City.

Our taxi in front - we got stuck at these lights for 30' as the green light only lasted 2 seconds

Our taxi in front – we got stuck at these lights for 30′ as the green light only lasted 2 seconds

As we approach our destination Anne can hear an unusual sound from the front wheel. We decide a visit to BMW is in order to check this out. On arrival at BMW, Anne then discovers a dented wheel rim! Anne and I recall a particularly bad pothole Anne hit on the highway, probably while avoiding other potholes or it could have happened this morning as she didn’t have time to see the coverless manhole before riding over it. We will now be staying 10 days not the 5 we had planned. Anna and Alberto are kind enough to extend their hospitality for another five days. We will get to see more of them and Mexico City than we had planned and enjoy relaxing in their lovely home.

– Anthony

17 comments on “Mexico, a new adventure

  1. You mean you drove over an uncovered manhole ??! Poor Streak. Lucky girlie. But your smiling faces on arriving say it all. xx

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    • That’s right – the traffic was such that you couldn’t leave any space between you and the vehicle in front of you and then it’s too late!! So glad we have new tyres!! Xx

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  2. Lucky Anne did not come off in the encounter with the manhole! Must have been a big whack to bend the rim! Excellent riding to stay on!!!! You seem to have the knock of bringing rain with you now, any thoughts of doing a ride through California as they look like the need the water, may be get paid for the effort.

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    • Very lucky, but she is a skilled rider. We are trying to avoid rain, we are not like the lorry driver in the ‘Hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy’ who was a minor rain god and rain followed him wherever he went. We have had very little overall so California will have to find new saviours.

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  3. All

    Just read the Mexico blog, you must have been tired half way through that, not surprising.

    Had a great but expensive time in Europe – fantastic trip

    Thanks for keeping me in mind, I have some interesting discussions going but would live to do a US trip.

    Take care, enjoy the extra 5 days in Mexico City and stay safe!

    Warm regards

    John McGagh john@mcgagh.com +61 408 983 761

    >

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  4. Am I the only one to think the dented wheel rim was a blessing in disguise, forcing you to take complete Time Out? Enjoy being looked after by Anna & Alberto, you need those 10 days’ rest! xxx

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  5. I am with Diane on the enforced R&R seeming well timed. You have ridden under some pretty difficult conditions so between the potholes and the rain I am not sure which is more challenging. I hate driving a car in the rain so can only imagine the extra vigilance required on the bikes. How wonderful that you had friends to greet you after a 3 hour city crossing! Enjoy the rest and I look forward to more Scotch and Beer photos… xxx

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  6. Yes, I agree with the above comments. We were exhausted reading the blog from the safety of our armchairs! So much concentration required to navigate through different countries. Enjoy your extended R & R ….. Just what’s needed…and relax ………. 😎😎😘😘

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  7. Well I have to agree with Diane. It was obvious that a higher force saw the need for a rest. Thank goodness you skimmed over the top of the manhole! The traffic looks unimaginably busy . I am sure you are enjoying being dry for most part of the day . Enjoy yourselves and rest up. We look forward to the next blog. Take care xxx

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    • Agreed that someone watches over us, maybe they needed a break as well. We have enjoyed our time here, but looking forward to being back on the road on Sunday. Traffic is not to bad! Must be a reflection of some of the other places we have ridden.

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  8. Great post, wish I could ride these roads! But then, head over to my blog and see what I have been up to these past two weeks- elephant watching in the wild from the seat of my bike…

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    • Oh and how we would love to ride in Botswana one day too. Haven’t been since we hitched through Africa in 1982!! Fab blog – thks for contacting us! Safe and happy riding!!!

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