Old Bagan to Naypyitaw

After our wonderful night’s camping, which we have since found out is illegal in Myanmar, (no wonder we had to negotiate for 45′ last night – oops!), a refreshing shower and yet another delicious and very copious meal, we are taken by coach to Old Bagan.

A bit of historical background courtesy of wikipedia. From 1044 to 1287, Bagan was the capital as well as the political, economic and cultural nerve center of the Pagan Empire. Over the course of 250 years, Bagan’s rulers and their wealthy subjects constructed over 10,000 religious monuments (approximately 1000 stupas, 10,000 small temples and 3000 monasteries) in an area of 104 square kms (40 sq mi). The Pagan Empire collapsed in 1287 due to repeated Mongol invasions (1277–1301) and the city formally ceased to be the capital of Burma in December 1297. Bagan had suffered from many earthquakes over the ages, with over 400 recorded earthquakes between 1904 and 1975. Many of these damaged pagodas underwent restorations in the 1990s by the military government, which sought to make Bagan an international tourist destination. However, the restoration efforts instead drew widespread condemnation from art historians and preservationists worldwide. Today, 2229 temples and pagodas remain. (www.wikipedia.com)

It feels strange to be traveling by air conditioned bus but it is great to be able to look at the countryside without having to concentrate on the road. The shadows are getting long, the lighting is making the contrasting colours more intense, we catch glimpses of individual stupas and pagodas from behind the bushes as we zoom past in our luxury coach. We would love to walk amongst them in the stunning countryside but we can only go where we are taken.

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

And our first stop is a lacquerware workshop. A typical tourist stop. Definitely not where we would have chosen to go to although it is interesting. Next stop is a massive gold covered temple. It is massive. There are many locals praying and paying their respects, but also such a massive tourist stop. The number of tourist we spot surprises us. Again it was an interesting stop but the countryside is calling me. The old simple pagodas have such a story to tell, especially as the evening mist is starting to rise. I am not the only one. We ask our guide if we can go to one of the simple, older pagodas. Ok. We finally get to an area with no other tourist coach – beautiful.

Basket maker, Bagan, Myanmar

Basket maker, Bagan, Myanmar

Myanmar lady with thanaka cream for its cosmetic and sunburn protection properties

Myanmar lady with thanaka cream for its cosmetic and sunburn protection properties


Shwezigon temple - (Golden Platform), Bagan, Myanmar

Shwezigon temple – (Golden Platform), Bagan, Myanmar


Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Myanmar mother and son

Myanmar mother and son

We can’t linger too long as we have to be somewhere else for the sunset so off we go. Now we get the biggest shock: there are coaches and coaches, thousands of tourists and sellers following us with their various wares, never taking no thank you as a final answer. It is dreadful. What are we doing here? We look at the massive pagoda and each level is covered in colourful ‘ants’. People everywhere!! Suddenly I worry about how Myanmar is going to be able to manage the obvious massive tourist influx, which we have since found out was 1 million in 2013 and expected to be 2 million this year.

I reluctantly join the line of tourists and climb the massive steps up the pagoda. And am I glad I did:

Shwesandaw pagoda, old Bagan, Myanmar

Shwesandaw pagoda, old Bagan, Myanmar


Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

Old Bagan, Myanmar

We head off the next day for Kalaw. The countryside is stunning, we enjoy a mid morning roadside stop. We love the people of Myanmar. Although they usually don’t speak a word of English, they are always welcoming, smile and chat (even if we don’t understand each other). They often bring extra chairs out for us to sit on. We are also often given free bottles of water at petrol stations.

With Floris and Dan at one of our roadside stops, Myanmar

With Floris and Dan at one of our roadside stops, Myanmar

Max at one our roadside stops on our way to Kalaw, Myanmar

Max at one our roadside stops on our way to Kalaw, Myanmar

Myanmar girl carefully choosing her candy

Myanmar girl carefully choosing her candy

When our guide sees us, he stops and tells us that we are to meet in 50kms for lunch. While our tour manager Tin was full of energy and enthusiasm and spoke good English, our guide has none of those attributes. As we get to about 40kms, I spot our guide on the left hand side of the road in the shadows of trees with no pilot car to be seen anywhere. This led to the first of many, many frustrated conversations I and then others had with him that the pilot car should stop before and not after and 200 metres down the road and should be visible. In this instance, one of our group had driven right past so Anthony went on after him. Unfortunately, our poor guide, with his lack of communication and leadership skills ended up causing frustrations within the group. Nothing major, but some grating.

After our massive, varied and delicious lunch, where we met Michael (an Aussie now living in Chiang Mai who flew into Myanmar for a week and hired a motorcycle to travel), we all set off to Kalaw. The weather is looking ominous, with growing rain clouds forming ahead. Eventually, it starts drizzling. As we ride up the mountain pass, two unnerving events happen. The road is horrendously slippery. I feel a couple of fish tails. Nothing too bad but unnerving. We slow down even more. A car that has just overtaken us does a full 180 spin just in front of Anthony after a sharp bend. The truck we have been following then overtaken has diesel slushing out of the top, all over the road!!!! Rain and diesel on the road does not make for a comfortable ride. Then suddenly, Streak stalls on me twice on as I am about to tackle a hairpin bend. Not nice. I pull over and stop as we spot Max pulled over too. He also has a problem with his bike. Something is not right with Streak. Streak is ‘coughing’ and loses power just when I need to open up. As we’re chatting with Max, the diesel truck drives past. No!!!!!!! Now we will be behind him again, with more spilled diesel on the road… Anyway, we ‘limp’ to our next hotel without incident. Unlike Michael who unfortunately came off his bike and damaged his knee.

What a lovely spot! Individual chalets. Garth invites us to his chalet for a drink – he bought a small bottle of the local whisky, my first alcoholic drink for ages as I don’t drink beer. We discuss my bike problem and he offers to show us the modification he made to his fuel filter and how to change the fuel pump. He carries two extra fuel pumps and very kindly insists we should have one of them.

Hoping the rain will hold off  heading up the mountain towards Kalaw, Myanmar

Hoping the rain will hold off heading up the mountain towards Kalaw, Myanmar

Heading up the mountain towards Kalaw, Myanmar

Heading up the mountain towards Kalaw, Myanmar

It is festival time in Myanmar so the temples are crowded and music is blearing

It is festival time in Myanmar so the temples are crowded and music is blearing

Our lovely cottage accommodation at Kalaw, Myanmar

Our lovely cottage accommodation at Kalaw, Myanmar

Garth showing us what we might need to do to fix Anne's fuel pump problem

Garth showing us what we might need to do to fix Anne’s fuel pump problem

We only have 70kms to ride the next day to get to Nyaungshwe. It is a beautiful, relaxed ride, through serene countryside, where life seems to unfold at a very slow gentle speed.

Myanmar monk

Myanmar monk

Typical scene in Myanmar

Typical scene in Myanmar

Typical Myanmar scene

Typical Myanmar scene

Typical Myanmar scene

Typical Myanmar scene

Heading into Nyaungshwe, Myanmar

Heading into Nyaungshwe, Myanmar

Heading into Nyaungshwe, Myanmar

Heading into Nyaungshwe, Myanmar

Nyaungshwe, Myanmar

Nyaungshwe, Myanmar


We have the afternoon off. Time for some bike maintenance, organising what laundry we need done which we give to the hotel (it always feels so luxurious when we don’t have to do all the washing by hand), a nana nap for Anthony while I go out and explore the village and market. This is where I buy cakes, candles and chocolates for Anthony’s 60th.

We have all heard of the fire balloon festival and organise ourselves some transport up to Taunggyi as it is not part of our program.

We are off to Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar - Garth, Kristjan and Rolfe

We are off to Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar – Garth, Kristjan and Rolfe

We arrive at what looks like a massive fair, with blaring music coming from several stands, each one outdoing the other. The noise is horrendous. What is this?!?! As we allow ourselves to melt into the crowd and slowly walk from one stand to another, we start to enjoy what is happening here. It is definitely a local event. It is joyous. Food stalls, candy stalls, beer vendors, people picnicking. We are taken to where the fire balloons will be launched in 2 hours. So we all go our separate ways and eventually find each other again some hours later. The preparation of the first balloon by the ‘red team’ took ages but was fascinating. It started with some drumming and dancing, gradually getting more and more frenetic. We keep being offered drinks and ‘stuff’ which we politely decline. But I eventually accept the repeated offers to join in the dancing. Watching, and for Anthony, being part of the building of the balloon, the lighting of the lanterns and seeing the balloon take off into the night sky was fascinating! What an amazing evening!! Make sure you watch his video.

Anthony talking to one of the Taunggyi fire balloon competitors, Myanmar

Anthony talking to one of the Taunggyi fire balloon competitors, Myanmar

Candy floss seller at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Candy floss seller at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

One of thousands of lanterns to be lit at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

One of thousands of lanterns to be lit at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar


We were offered prime viewing seating at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

We were offered prime viewing seating at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar


Anthony has been promoted by the red team and given lighting candle and lighter at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Anthony has been promoted by the red team and given lighting candle and lighter at the Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar


Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Taunggyi fire balloon festival, Myanmar

Today, November 4th, is a full day on Inle Lake. We travel by long boat, powered by extremely noisy engines. The boat ride to the floating villages is long, noisy and fume filled. We are taken to a temple, observe silk weaving, lotus thread weaving, blacksmithing, cigar making. We really have no interest in visiting those places having been taken to similar ones so many times on our travels. We would be so much happier wondering quieter local streets, having a drink at small roadside shacks, visiting small monasteries or temples, all away from the tourist coaches and touristy boats. Towards the end of the day, we are dropped off on the west bank of the lake and walk a couple of kilometers to a natural spring spa. It is quiet and we only see a few locals on scooters. Wonderful. Until we arrive at the spa!! Ha, not so quiet. But we are here now so we may as well indulge. Our bodies are grateful. Some of my impressive bruises are now on display. It is funny how I still clearly remember thinking – oh ho, this will be interesting as I realised I was going down on that forest trail. Anyway, the spa is relaxing and does us good. Dinner tonight is at a very touristy pizza restaurant. We will be glad to return to quieter rural Myanmar tomorrow.

Our boats on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Our boats on Inle Lake, Myanmar

"Street" and powerlines on Inle Lake, Myanmar

“Street” and powerlines on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Horrific noise and air pollution on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Horrific noise and air pollution on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Ingenious one legged rowing used by fishermen on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Ingenious one legged rowing used by fishermen on Inle Lake, Myanmar

Finished our Inle Lake tour at natural springs and enjoyed a soak in a hot tub

Finished our Inle Lake tour at natural springs and enjoyed a soak in a hot tub

Our favourite part of Inle Lake - a quiet meander through the reeds

Our favourite part of Inle Lake – a quiet meander through the reeds

The destination today 5th November is Naypyitaw, 290kms away, the capital of Myanmar. (On 6 November 2005, the administrative capital of Burma was officially moved to a greenfield approximately 320 km north of Yangon/Rangoon). We have a choice of 2 routes but the other route is totally unknown and could be similar to our 2nd day so, because of the state of number of bikes, including mine, the consensus is to backtrack back beyond Kalaw – none of us like to backtrack. Anthony and I decide to leave 45′ ahead of the others as I am not looking forward to the mountain crossing with my bike ‘coughing’ as it is. We wait 45′ for the others at a junction south and start to wonder if they took a turn before our junction as they are all faster than us and should have arrived by now. So we head off alone. Unbeknownst to us, one of the bikes had a new problem and they all ended up leaving much later. We have a lovely ride. We get to the outskirts of Naypyidaw and get totally and utterly lost and completely soaked – it is pouring!!! We turn off to the left – end up in the air force area. The 4 lane dual carriage way is deserted. Turn back quick. Next we end up in the grey roof area. The residential areas are carefully organized, roofs colour coded and apartments are allotted according to rank and marital status. We finally spot a tiny army checkpoint and stop for help. We give our hotel name but no one has heard of it. After about an hour, we understand that there are 2 hotels with similar sounding names and are given one of the army officers to show us the way. It is now absolutely pouring, the rain drops can be felt through our jackets so the poor guy must really feel it!

Typical street in Naypyitaw, Myanmar capital with our army officer leading us to our hotel

Typical street in Naypyitaw, Myanmar capital with our army officer leading us to our hotel

30′ later we arrive at a hotel and staff is waiting for us!!!!! (We had been given the wrong name.). What a welcome. Ladies in beautiful traditional dress are waiting with a bouquet of flowers for each one of us. We are taking to our bungalow. Wow. The accommodation we have stayed at throughout Myanmar has been amazing! And the staff always so attentive and responsive.

Next stop, Yangon (Rangoon).

– Anne

12 comments on “Old Bagan to Naypyitaw

  1. Treating us to another set of wonderful photos and appreciate your frustration at being taken to tourist traps. The balloons are amazing , so beautiful. The contrast with India is noticeable – the temples fascinating. Hope all goes more smoothly and Streak behaves herself. Look after yourselves, take care !!

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  2. Incroyable le festival des ballons a air chaud! super belles photos. Bon courage avec Streak : ( Anthony a passe un joyeux anniversaire? avons hate d’en lire plus dans quelques jours xxx bravo encore pour votre blog : )))

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  3. Another visual feast : lush countryside, “furnished” skies and innovative forms of local transport. But why is camping illegal I wonder? Loved the candle-lit balloons, a miracle they don’t go up in smoke. They obviously don’t have spoilsport Elf’n Safety in Myanmar. Hope Streak will be better soon. xx

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    • Until now, everything was totally controlled by the government. Hence the need for us to have a guide and pilot car at all times. Things are slowly changing and improving. And yrs, there are accidents with those balloons! We saw quite a few lanterns falling off. And one balloon did catch fire a few days before we were there with terrible results…. Streak will be fixed on Monday: we have identified the cause and are now waiting for a part. Xxx

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  4. Je regarde une émission sur l’Australie et j’ai tout de suite penser à vous. Je suis contente de voir que la Birmanie change peu à peu et que c’est avant tout un superbe pays, je ne le penser pas si touristique!!! J espere qu’Anthony passe un superbe anniversaire (a t il soufflé toutes les bougies des ballons??? ;); J’espere que tout va pour le mieux et que vous continuer d ‘être en pleine forme ; ) Bisous depuis notre petite France!

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  5. I love the scenery, the clear roads, you two on the bonnet of the blue truck and in the spa, the balloon festival, the candy floss and the fact that Anne’s lovely white jacket is so dirty!!! You’ve obviously having a great time!!
    Take care, lots of love xxxx 🙂

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  6. What a visual feast in this blog! Your photos of Old Bagan are amazing especially the ones at dusk. I was so glad you captured the balloon on video as I was wondering how the bamboo frame of yellow candles would be used and next thing it is up in the sky as a banner. Good to hear that the hotels and staff have been a positive experience – may it continue xx

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    • Myanmar continued to be a wonderful place to visit. We so wanted to spend more time there but were not allowed. We are sure travelling conditions will continue to ease over time but it was not to be for us this time. Still, a real priviledge to be there.xx

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